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EdChat News Saturday, June 23

Using Phenomena to Engage Students in Science

  • Phenomena observable facts or events are the ideal basis for lessons in the science classroom.
  • As an instructor, Ive taught countless examples of phenomena that have resonated with students atmany grade levels and indifferent subjects.
  • By connecting experiential phenomena to lessons in your classroom, you wont just instill scientific fundamentals in your students youll inspire them to see science everywhere around them.
  • When studying phenomena, students are able to jumpstart their own thinking at the beginning of their journey as they begin to address the purpose of the lessons rather than at the end.
  • When you design classroom activities that actively engage students, theyll have theunderstandings they need to demonstrate mastery of a topic to themselves, to their classmates and insummative assessments.

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Using Phenomena to Engage Students in Science | Fresh ideas for teaching blog

3 Lessons Learned On The Way High Quality Student Work – TeachThought PD

  • Lessons Learned On The Journey To High Quality Student Work (Part 1) – – by Eric White, TeachThought PD Workshop Facilitator – – *this blog is part 1 of 2 (read part 2 here) – – Contact Us to bring Eric to help your school grow!
  • Lesson #1: Provide Feedback When the Clay is Wet – – When providing feedback on student work, one rule rings true: do it early and often.
  • Nothing can kill a students drive more than being asked to revise work, especially if it involves drastic changes, after theyve already committed an extensive amount of time.
  • It can build a culture of high quality work in the classroom, and it truly warms my heart to see students mutually invest in each other.
  • Lesson #3: Honor the Patina, Not Just the Shine – – In my zeal to lead students to high quality work, I became obsessed with how the final products looked, especially with student projects.

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3 Lessons Learned On The Way High Quality Student Work – TeachThought PD

Be YOUR Best

  • During the conclusion of one of our Final Exam days, I had a student come seek me out.
  • This was a student who I have developed a very good relationship with and, as a result, have been able to engage in very candid dialogue with throughout the year.
  • The student asked me, Mr. Smith, what will it take for me to elevate to the level of [student name – a Senior]?
  • The previous summer, primarily as a result of attending the The previous summer, primarily as a result of attending the National Principal’s Conference in Philadelphia and experiencing somewhat of a professional rejuvenation, I wanted to put tremendous emphasis for our stakeholders to focus on a relatively simple idea: – -…
  • Thank you for viewing, – – The opinions shared in this blog belong to Craig Smith and do not represent the school or district in which he works.

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Be YOUR Best

Ditching Traditional Grades & My Online Grade Book

  • In an effort to do all three of these thingscreate transparency, teach self-assessment, and archive work onlineAND keep parents in the loop, my teaching partner and I developed a Google Document for the first unit of the year with 10 focus standards for each classEnglish, science, and technology.
  • Then each student shared their ongoing assessment document with his/her parents as a Comment only document, so parents could follow their childs progress and post questions.
  • The Ongoing Assessment document was designed to encourage students to take ownership of both their work and the evaluation of that work.
  • In her book, Sackstein addresses the questions and concerns many teachers have about dedicating this much class time to conversations with students about their progress.
  • Students left our meeting with a clear sense of where to spend their time and energy to improve in relation to specific skills.

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Ditching Traditional Grades & My Online Grade Book

Teaching & Assessing Soft Skills

  • Students who leave high school with strong soft skills will work more harmoniously with others and be more successful tackling unfamiliar tasks.
  • However, teachers must explicitlyteach these soft skills in school.
  • Then I created rubrics so students would know exactly what these soft skills look like in practice.
  • Now my teacher teamuses these rubrics to give each student feedback on where he/she is in relation to mastering these crucial skills.
  • If you have strategies or resources you use to support students in developing their soft skills, please post a comment and share them!

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Teaching & Assessing Soft Skills

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Students’ end-of-year artwork 2018 – your entries so far

Two Lessons on Cloud Types and Their Names

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Two Lessons on Cloud Types and Their Names

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Schools and Mental Health Education: 2 States Now Require It By Law

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Schools and Mental Health Education: 2 States Now Require It By Law | Jeff Emmerson

Vol 24, No 1 (2018)

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Vol 24, No 1 (2018)