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EdChat News Tuesday, March 13 New teaching strategies, Technology tools, Choice boards & more…

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EdChat News TLDR / Table of Contents

  • Students Learn More When THEY Do the Work
    • new teaching strategies, technology tools, dramatically different outcome, ongoing assessment document, teachers design lessons
  • Interactive Learning Menus (Choice Boards) Using Google Docs
    • Differentiate with Learning Menus Using Google Docs! I love learning menus, and it is one of my favorite ways to incorporate choice and differentiate learning. What are Learning Menus? Learning menus or choice boards are a form of differentiated learning that give students a menu or choice of learning activities….
    • choice boards, middle square, Unit Tic-Tac-Toe menu, blank tic-tac-toe template, Study Tic-Tac-Toe template
  • Introducing the One-Sentence Lesson Plan
    • Focus your planning by getting clear on just three things: the WHAT, the HOW, and the WHY.
    • one-sentence lesson plan, students, , ,

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Students Learn More When THEY Do the Work

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  • I regularly work with teachers who like the idea of trying new teaching strategies, blended learning models, and technology tools, but they dont have the time or energy to experiment.
  • Below is an example of what it looks like to shift the work from the teacher to the student with the goal of placing students at the center of learning.
  • This second approach shifts the work from the teacher to the student.
  • If teachers design lessons that require students do the lions share of the work in the classroom, the benefits are two-fold: 1) teachers wont be so exhausted and 2) students will learn more.
  • I hope that if teachers are not exhausted, theyll be more willing to try new teaching strategies, blended learning models, and technology tools.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text el_class=”topfeed-tags”]Tags: new teaching strategies, technology tools, dramatically different outcome, ongoing assessment document, teachers design lessons[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_separator][vc_column_text el_class=”topfeed-tweet”]

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text el_class=”topfeed-embedly”]Students Learn More When THEY Do the Work |[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row el_id=”Interactive-Learning-Menus-Choice-Boards-Using-Google-Docs”][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_separator][vc_column_text]

Interactive Learning Menus (Choice Boards) Using Google Docs

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  • I love learning menus, and it is one of my favorite ways to incorporate student choice and to differentiate learning.
  • Learning menus (aka choice boards)are a form of differentiated learning that gives students a menu or choice of learning activities.
  • I have found that menus and choice boards tend to be more popular among elementary teachers, but I used them in my middle school classroom, and now I use them in professional learning workshops with adults.
  • Student choice is the big idea behind learning menus and choice boards.
  • Then I move into an activity like the Chrome PD Tic-Tac-Toe learning menu to allow teachers to dig deeper into their own subject areas and grade levels AND move at a pace that is comfortable for their level and learning style.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text el_class=”topfeed-tags”]Tags: choice boards, middle square, Unit Tic-Tac-Toe menu, blank tic-tac-toe template, Study Tic-Tac-Toe template[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_separator][vc_column_text el_class=”topfeed-tweet”]

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text el_class=”topfeed-embedly”]Interactive Learning Menus (Choice Boards) with G Suite – FREE Templates[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row el_id=”Introducing-the-One-Sentence-Lesson-Plan”][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_separator][vc_column_text]

Introducing the One-Sentence Lesson Plan

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  • Using the previous example, I might use one of the following: – – Students will be able to evaluate the credibility of online sources by triangulating information.
  • The WHY may start with the prompt, so that… Continuing with the example of evaluating sources, I could state: – – Students will be able to evaluate the credibility of online sources by triangulating information, so that they make better decisions.
  • For my lesson on evaluating sources, I could start by activating students prior knowledge: With so much out there, how do you decide what information to trust online?
  • Based on my one-sentence lesson plan, heres a simple outline for a high school class period: – – Opening: Ask students about their experiences searching for information online.
  • I can take an 8th grade Common Core standard such as, Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision, and turn it into a one-sentence lesson plan: – – Using Jules Vernes Journey…

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[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text el_class=”topfeed-embedly”]Introducing the One-Sentence Lesson Plan | Cult of Pedagogy[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]